Penlee House Gallery & Museum, Penzance
The artistic heart of West Cornwall's history

Photography

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"A First Taste of The Atlantic."

Second of a series of six postcards depicting sea sickness on the passage from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly. It shows the bow of the Lyonnesse with various passengers clinging onto its sides as it ploughs through rough seas.

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"A General Collapse"

Last of a series of six postcards depicting sea sickness on the passage from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly. Men and women, now without their hats, are being ill over the side of the boat with the rough sea behind them.

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"Cornish" Or "Lancashire" Boilers And Flues Being Test Erected At Harvey's Foundry, Hayle, C.1870

A group of unidentified men watching the "Cornish" or "Lancashire" boilers and flues being test erected at Harvey's Foundry c. 1870. The "Cornish" boiler had one large flue containing the fire; the "Lancashire" boiler had two.

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"Creating An Impression" On Arrival At Penzance Station

Black ink cartoon of Penzance station with a lady's arrival. Behind her a station porter is pushing her boxes entitled 'Puritan Soap'. Crowds are watching either side and there is a 'welcome' sign under the 'station' sign.

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"Effect of A Cross Sea"

Third of a series of six postcards depicting sea sickness on the passage from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly. shows two ladies holding onto their hats and the railings of the Lyonnesse. There is a wave behind them and various men in the background.

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"Far, Far From Land"

Fourth of a series of six postcards depicting sea sickness on the passage from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly. There is only 1 lady standing but she is leaning over the railings of the boat and the rest are all kneeling on the deck with their heads over the side of the boat evidently being very ill!

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"Life Becomes A Burden"

Fifth of a series of six postcards depicting sea sickness on the passage from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly. Sea sick people are holding onto the sides of the Lyonnesse as it goes through rough seas. There is only one person standing, a lady holding onto her hat and the side of the boat.

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"Small Fry!"

A comical cartoon of a seated man and woman surrounded by a blue frame.

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"Teddy" Cain On His Ex-French Crabber In Penzance Harbour, Flying A Sail Advertising "The Wooden Horse" Film Which Was On At The Ritz.

E.M.A. (Teddy) Cain on his ex-French crabber in Penzance Harbour with the sail advertising the "Wooden Horse" - a film of 'daring escape' - which was on at the Ritz for three days. Alderman Edward Morley Cain was known as "Ema" in the Post Office Telephones where he was the foreman fitter (Technician 1st Class). Wharf Road is in the background, specifically the gas works and gasometer.

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"The Cheesewring" Near Liskeard, Cornwall.

Situated on the eastern end of Bodmin Moor near Minions, this is a photograph of the "Cheesewring" which is a granite outcrop over ten metres high, with an unidentified man in bowler hat sat on a slab with his legs spread out at the foot of the stones. The geology of the structure suggests that it was formed when molten granite intruded into the surrounding slate more than 250 million years ago and the softer slate has been eroded by rain, wind and plant life, since. Legend offers an alternative version: that the outcrop is the result of a contest between the giant 'Uther' and the Christian 'St Tue' who won assisted by an angel who placed the top rock which will turn three times if the rocks hear a cock crow.

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"The Chrysolite" Three Masted Schooner

The three masted schooner "The Chrysolite" in full sail. Built at Whitehaven as a barquentine (Official number: 58190) in 1869, the Chrysolite was acquired by Joseph Denley, Penzance Coal Merchant and Scrap Dealer in 1887, when she was converted to a three-masted schooner and registered at Penzance on June 17 1887. In Joe Denley's employ, she spent most of her time running between Penzance and the Bristol Channel. He disposed of her to Whitstable owners in January 1914, and a further record gives her as having been registered at Manchester in 1917, in the ownership of the Anglo-French Coasting Co Ltd. On August 3rd 1918, the British wooden schooner left Swansea for Treguier, Brittany, with a cargo of coal and went missing. She was widely thought to have been mined or sunk by a U boat, but in July 1919, her owners brought an unsuccessful action against the owners of the SS Gerent, for negligence. They claimed that the 'Chrysolite' had been run down and sunk by that steamer, which they tried to prove by a Penzance sailmaker identifying a piece of torn sail-cloth found on the bows of the steamer. During the subsequent trial, the court found that even if the steamer had run down the schooner, there was no evidence that her captain, officers and crew had been negligent in their navigation of the vessel. The court found for the defendants and the cause of the loss of the schooner appears to have been left open. The 3 masted schooner was built of wood. 128 net tons.

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"The Pirate's Grave" In Gulval Churchyard

"The pirate's grave" in Gulval churchyard (east end of church, outside window)

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"Waiting For The Boats". Cornish Fish Wife

Postcard of a fish wife sitting on a caul with the sea and the coastline behind her. She has a striped shawl around her shoulders and is wearing a hat. Her hands are on her lap.

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"Wall" 4 Cylinder Distributor Made By Dyer

"Wall" 4 cylinder distributor made by Dyer

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"Wall" 4 Cylinder, 4 Stroke Engine Made By Dyer

"Wall" 4 cylinder, 4 stroke engine made by Dyer

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"Wall" Jet Carburettor Made By Dyer

"Wall" jet carburettor made by Dyer

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"William Wriothesley Wingfield December 1814 - 1907"

Photograph of Reverend W.W. Wingfield, vicar of Gulval

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'"Trouble Brewing." A Holiday Trip.'

First of a series of six postcards depicting sea sickness on the passage from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly. It shows a crowd of people on the deck of the Lyonnesse with a lady leaning over the railings on the right looking at the white spray of the rough sea.

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'A Midsummer Night's Dream' Performed In Penlee Memorial Park In August 1948

Ernest Peirce."The man who brought Shakespeare to Cornwall" had organised successful Shakespearean plays, initially in Penzance and then later all over Cornwall, for a number of years before World War Two. With the blessing and support of Penzance Corporation, in 1948 he reintroduced the seasonal plays which attracted average audiences of 800 people. The Festival ceased on his death in 1952.

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'Coast Near Gurnard's Head'

The coastline near Gurnard's Head, Zennor. An example of granite stone walling can be seen in the foreground, with the corner of a cottage to the bottom left-hand side. The building in the background is possibly Gurnard's Head pub.

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'First And Last Refreshment House In England By Wm Thomas'

A photograph of the 'First and Last Refreshment House in England By Wm Thomas' at Lands End. William Thomas stands below the sign, which is attached to the end of the house. A boy, possibly his son, stands in the doorway. A souvenir stand selling photographs stands just outside the door. Pictured here before the extension was built.

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'Knill Ceremony' At Knill Steeple, St Ives

A photograph of the 'Knill Ceremony' at Knill's Steeple pre-1914, with 10 little girls, a fiddler, two widows, the mayor, vicar and customs officer and a Master of Ceremonies, watched by a large crowd of onlookers. John Knill was Customs Officer in St Ives between 1762 and 1782 and Mayor in 1767. He was instrumental in the building of Smeaton's Pier and the wall along Porthmeor Beach which prevented Downlong being inundated with wind blown sand. He built Knill's Steeple in 1782 and wrote his Trust Deed for the Knill Ceremony in 1797. Knill was present at the first ceremony in 1801 and he left an annuity for the upkeep of the Ceremony and several charities. The Ceremony took place on St James' Day (25th July) every 5 years. The 10 little girls & widows dance around the Steeple to the Furry Dance tune. Then the Old Hundredth Psalm: 'All People That on Earth do Dwell' is sung. Knill died in London in 1811. See also 2016.50.475 and 476.

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'Lady of The Isles' Aground At Lamorna Cove In 1904.

'Lady of the Isles', the steamer which plied the Penzance to Isles of Scilly route, was on a pleasure trip to Lamorna on 1st September 1904 when she struck the Little Heaver rocks off Carn Du. Her passengers were taken off and she was run ashore near the pier at Lamorna. Subsequently refloated and towed to Penzance, 'Lady of the Isles' was sold as a salvage vessel and served until 3 October 1940 when she was sunk by a mine off the Manacles. The @Lady of the Isles' was built by Harveys of Hayle for the West Cornwall Steamship Company in 1875. (The first Scilly steamship the 'Little Western' served from 1859 to 1872 when she was wrecked.)

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'Monument To Augustus Smith Tresco

A photograph of the monument to Augustus Smith, who built Tresco Abbey in 1834, coming from Hertfordshire and taking up the position of Lord Proprietor, leaseholder of the islands. It is made from boulders of granite and protected by metal railings to the right-hand side. A man sits on the bottom stone. Augustus broke with the tradition of absentee landlords and incompetent agents to make Tresco his permanent home. He restructured the failing farm industry, encouraged new ideas like the flower business and built schools on all the main islands, making education compulsory 30 years before the rest of Britain.

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