Penlee House Gallery & Museum, Penzance
The artistic heart of West Cornwall's history

Photography

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Western Hunt Pony Club Presentation At The Kenegie Country Club, Gulval

A group photograph of the Western Hunt Pony Club presentation to Carmione Oats by Jill Hocking (later Thomas) of what appears to be a pen set in a presentation box, at Kenegie Country Club. People identified in the group are from L to R: Jill Hocking (later Thomas); Ben Sparrow; Duncan Simpson; Ann Laity (later Boock); Carmione Oats; Wilmay Le Grice; Arthur Davy-Thomas; Joan Laity (later Howells); behind Mr Davy-Thomas and Mrs Greenwood-Perry (and three other unidentified people next to Mrs Greenwood-Perry).

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Western Hunt Pony Club Presentation At The Kenegie Country Club, Gulval

A group photograph of the Western Hunt Pony Club presentation to Carmione Oats by Jill Hocking (later Thomas) of what appears to be a pen set in a presentation box, at Kenegie Country Club. People identified in the group are from L to R: Jill Hocking (later Thomas); Ben Sparrow; Duncan Simpson; Ann Laity (later Boock); Carmione Oats; Wilmay Le Grice; Arthur Davy-Thomas; Joan Laity (later Howells); behind Mr Davy-Thomas and Mrs Greenwood-Perry (and three other unidentified people next to Mrs Greenwood-Perry).

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Western Promenade Towards The Queens Hotel, Penzance

Penzance Promenade with unidentified ladies walking towards the camera. In view is the shelter built in 1906 and seats adjacent to it added between 1899 and 1902, the New Queens Building added in 1908, the Queens Extension of 1871, the original Queens Hotel from 1862, Mounts Bay house built in 1865 and the Bandstand from 1905. The Esplanade was built in 1844, the road asphalted in 1869 and the turret on the Queens Hotel which is in view, would subsequently be destroyed by fire in 1937.

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Western Union Telegraph And Cable Company, Penzance, The Instrument Room

Staff in the 'instrument room' of the Western Union Telegraph and Cable Company. The instruments shown are siphon recorders which record incoming and outgoing signals as a wavering ink line on long strips of paper called 'slip'.

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Whales On Eastern Beach, Penzance

This could taken from a postcard or a photograph printed with the caption 'Whales on Eastern Beach, Penzance' below. This appears to be a stranded whale with 20 or more people standing around the corpse. It was probably the occasion when about 60 pilot whales were stranded on the beach in 1911. They were not re-floated and Coastguard Lieutenant Chamber, in a humane gesture, ordered his men to shoot the whales.

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Wharf Road, St Ives From The West Pier

The view towards Wharf Road. In the centre is the band stand built in 1933 overhanging the harbour.

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Wharf Road, St.Ives

St.Ives Wharf from Wharf Road Promenade. The White Heart can be seen far left, the Friendship Cellar is the large building centre back, the Fisherman's Co-op is the building far right.The lifeboat slip can be seen centre left

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Wharfside In The Early 1960s

Wharfside Penzance, just after the building of the car park in the early 1960s. The gas works is operational; Cornish Mines Supplies and Willie Hall Haulage occupy site of present day Wharfside shopping development Willie Hall and Dodges Mine uses a dark blue livery whilst that of the Cornish Mines was orange. Branwell Mills was then Parker's Department Store.

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Wheal Call And Cape Cornwall, Kenidjack Valley, Cornwall.

A photograph of Cape Cornwall with part of Wheal Call (sometimes called Cole) in the foreground. The nearest property is the Wheal Call House (which is now a holiday let), and the top of the winding engine house for the Cape Cornwall mine is in the centre of the photograph and Porth Ledden Cove is to the right. Wheal Call was part of the Boswedden group of mines. Most of the lodes for this group ran NW. As in many of the mines in this location, working took place under the sea. At Wheal Call, a diagonal shaft was used, similar to Boscawen Shaft at Botallack. It is believed that workings here started in the early 19th century, but tin bounds agreements dating from 1787 have survived. By 1841, 100 men, 2 women and 26 boys were employed, but later developments were hampered by the erratic quality of the lode and apparent lack of investment. Source: "The St Just Mining District" by Cyril Noall, Bradford Barton.

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Wheal-headed Cross, Madron, Cornwall

At grid reference NG 445325, stands a level-headed or round cross, near the wishing well at Madron. A way-side cross and route-marker to Madron Church or the Baptistery, the stone cross dates from the 9th Century in Cornwall.

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Where The River Meets The Sea On A Stormy Day

Water channelled from the old mine workings at Ding Dong meet the sea here at Lariggan. It is a blustery day with high water levels at spring tide. The sides of the bridge, reconstructed after the 1962 storms, spanning the river have been flattened.

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Wherry Town Mine In Mount's Bay

Etching of Wherry Town Mine shaft situated out to sea between Penzance and Newlyn, with the Battery and St. Michael's Mount in the background. Built in 1778 by Thomas Curtis of Breage, the mine shaft was protected by a stone breakwater. Thomas Gundry erected a steam engine on shore to facilitate lifting the ore from the mine workings. Operations ceased in 1798 when an American vessel anchored in the bay, broke its moorings and crashed into and demolished the head gear. It re-opened in the 1830s but closed again in 1840

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Wherry Town Mine In Mount's Bay

Etching made for the Royal Geographical Society of Wherry Town Mine shaft situated out to sea between Penzance and Newlyn, with the Battery and St. Michael's Mount in the background. Built in 1778 by Thomas Curtis of Breage, the mine shaft was protected by a stone breakwater. Thomas Gundry erected a steam engine on shore to facilitate lifting the ore from the mine workings. Operations ceased in 1798 when an American vessel anchored in the bay, broke its moorings and crashed into and demolished the head gear. It re-opened in the 1830s but closed again in 1840. The headgear is illustrated and what appears to be a ventilation shaft.

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Wherry Town Mine In Mounts Bay

This is a photograph of a Wherry Town Mine shaft situated out to sea between Penzance and Newlyn, exposed during a very low tide . Built in 1778 by Thomas Curtis of Breage, the mine shaft was protected by a stone breakwater. Thomas Gundry erected a steam engine on shore to facilitate lifting of the ore from the mine workings. Operations ceased in 1798 when an American vessel anchored in the bay, broke its moorings and crashed into it, demolishing the head gear. It re-opened in the 1830s but closed again in 1840.

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Whitesand Bay, Cornwall

Whitesands Bay at low tide.

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Wing Commander Guy Gibson Reading A Book On A Lovely Summer's Day

This looks like a coloured snapshot of Wing Commander Guy Gibson, VC DSO DFC from Porthlevensitting in a garden reading a book. His exploits in World War II became legendary. Guy Gibson was born in Simla, and moved to Penzance with his mother and siblings at the age of 6, where he attended the West Cornwall School, then in Chapel Street. He joined the Royal Air Force in 1936 and by the outbreak of the Second World War had become a bomber with 83 Squadron. He won the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1940 on Bomber Command's first raid of the war and transferred to Fighter Command. At the age of 23, he was promoted to the rank of wing commander, being posted back to Bomber Command. In May 1943, Gibson was selected to carry out the highly dangerous Dambusters Raid, using the Barnes Wallis 'bouncing bomb'. For his role in this mission, Gibson was awarded the Victoria Cross. He died the following year.

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Winter Threshing At An Unknown Location In The 1940's.

Winter threshing with a steam engine. Note that the men are working in overcoats, and the old binder canvas is hanging at the rear to protect the engine driver from the wind. Note also the iron brackets hanging in front of the rear wheel which were known as 'spuds'. These would be bolted on to the rear wheels to give the engine more traction on wet ground. Note the wooden jack against the rear wheel which kept the engine from rocking to and fro when working.

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Wolf Rock Lighthouse

This picture was taken probably from one of the Trinity House tenders. There is a heavy sea but the lighthouse can be identified by the upper part of its 1835 beacon, the base of which is now partially incorporated into the landing stage.

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Woodland Stream At Rosehill

A woodland stream at Rosehill at Alverton. A mossy stone wall stands to the left. A pillared man-made monument sits in the background, to the right.

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Workers On Penzance Quay With Trade Vehicle.

A group workers facing the camera with what looks like either a new or reconditioned Thornycroft (vehicle) probably 'J' or 'K' type possibly ex WD, issued to J.H. Bennetts, trade, of Market Jew Street in 1919/20. Thornycroft of Basingstoke and Southampton, moved into the production of i.c. engined vehicles in 1907. 'J' & 'K' types were made from 1913 and about 500 'J's were built during WW1. The 'J' was of 4 ton capacity. The vehicle shown looks to be long wheelbase. The material to be shifted looks as if it is coal and maybe for local mine steam engines rather than domestic use. Sources: Wikipedia; Hampshireculturaltrust.org.uk; Registration records compiled by Margaret Perry.

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Workmen For The Cornwall Power Supply Company Laying The First Electricity Cable In Penzance

The laying of the first electricity power cable in North Street (Causewayhead) Penzance.

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Workmen On The Promenade At Penzance Laying Slabs.

A posed photograph of unidentified workmen before laying the last of the slabs to incorporate the compass stone on the promenade at Penzance. The man on the left with watch and chain is probably the foreman. All of the men seem to be wearing knee pads and some are standing and some kneeling. Cafe Marina is in the background as is 'Dingley's Hotel' and Newlyn on the horizon.

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Workmen On The Promenade At Penzance.

A posed photograph of workmen laying slabs on Penzance promenade with the laid slabs in the foreground, Cafe Marina and 'Dingley's' Hotel in the background and Newlyn on the horizon. The promenade had been built in 1844 but the tarmac used was ruining people's clothes and footwear and so the Western end of the promenade was laid with this pink concrete paving supplied by James Runnalls of Penlee Quarry, when the storms of 1895 had largely destroyed the previous surface. William Julyan would have been Mayor of Penzance in 1897 when the slabs were laid. Mayor Alderman WJ Bazeley JP and Councillors re-opened the Promenade officially by unveiling the "Compass Stone" (the last slab laid). The event was to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897.

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Workmen On The Promenade At Penzance.

An photograph of men preparing part of the Promenade to be paved, taken looking towards the Queens Hotel. Some wood is in place which two men appear to be checking is level and others look towards the camera. A number of tools including rakes, pick-axes and a roller are in the foreground. The promenade had been built in 1844 but the tarmac used was ruining people's clothes and footwear and the Western end of the promenade was then laid with pink concrete paving, when the storms of 1895 largely destroyed the previous surface. William Julyan would have been Mayor of Penzance in 1897 when the slabs were laid. Mayor Alderman WJ Bazeley JP and Councillors re-opened the Promenade officially by unveiling the "Compass Stone" (the last slab laid). The event was to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897.

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Wreck of 'Our Lizzie'

N May 1930, after a fishing trip to the Scillies, PZ109 Our Lizzie was rammed and run down on South Pier by PZ146 Water Lily. Neither boat was carrying regulation lights. She sank at 0300 hours, the crew being picked up by the Water Lily. She was towed into Newlyn Old harbour where she disintegrated. Left to right is the hulk of the Cretehill, Brixham trawler, Belgian trawler, steam drifter, French crabbers with the wreck of Our Lizzie in the foreground.

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