Penlee House Gallery & Museum, Penzance
The artistic heart of West Cornwall's history

Photography

Sort by Title: (A-Z) | (Z-A)     or     sort by Date Acquired: Latest | Earliest     with Images | without Images
Search within Photography:

Postcard Depicting A Line Drawing of St. John's Hall From South East Corner

Postcard depicting a line drawing of St. John's Hall from South East Corner

Acquisition date: --

view details >

The Fire Brigade Tries To Pump The Flood Water Away Following The Ash Wednesday Storms

Firemen are attempting to pump the flood water from around the Mounts Bay Inn and Harvey's timber yard. The landlord and landlady, Renee Nash, were about the only residents not evacuated from this area, preferring to stay with their means of living and keeping in touch by telephone. There is a plaque on its wall to commemorate the devastating effect this event had on Wherrytown. Flood damage to the neighbouring Coastguard's Row was severe and the houses were demolished. In 2012 this is an Indian restaurant.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Chysauster Courtyard Village, Near Badgers Cross, Penwith

Chysauster village - this Roman Iron Age Village was occupied from 100 BC to 300 AD. It comprised eight houses in two rows of four, separated by a winding street. Beyond is another house and the remains of several buildings in the surrounding fields. All the houses have a similar layout on an east-west axis with the entrance at the east. The east-west diameter is approximately 27.432 metres. (90 feet) There is a passage leading from the entrance to an inner courtyard approximately 7.62 metres (25 feet) in diameter. On the far side of the courtyard is a small circular room with chambers radiating from it. Rooms for storage and living were built into the walls which are as thick as 4.26 metres (14 feet) in places. In some of the houses there is evidence of covered stone drains. A quern for grinding grain can be seen at the site, as can a collapsed fougou or underground tunnel. The inhabitants survived by farming and raising livestock. There is evidence of enclosures where livestock could have been corralled. The people were possibly tin streamers. It is feasible that Chysauster came under the protection of the hill fort of Castle an Dinas to the east.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Chysauster Courtyard Village, Near Badgers Cross, Penwith

This is House Number 4 in the Roman Iron Age Village of Chysauster which was was occupied from 100 BC to 300 AD. It comprised eight houses in two rows of four, separated by a winding street. Beyond is another house and the remains of several buildings in the surrounding fields. All the houses have a similar layout on an east-west axis with the entrance at the east. The east-west diameter is approximately 27.432 metres. (90 feet) There is a passage leading from the entrance to an inner courtyard approximately 7.62 metres (25 feet) in diameter. On the far side of the courtyard is a small circular room with chambers radiating from it. Rooms for storage and living were built into the walls which are as thick as 4.26 metres (14 feet) in places. In some of the houses there is evidence of covered stone drains. A quern for grinding grain can be seen at the site, as can a collapsed fougou or underground tunnel. The inhabitants survived by farming and raising livestock. There is evidence of enclosures where livestock could have been corralled. The people were possiby tin streamers. It is feasible that Chysauster came under the protection of the hill fort of Castle and Dinas to the east.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Assembling For The 1919 Levant Inquest

A group gathers for the inquest into the Levant Mine disaster at the Accounts Office (large building centre right), converted into the Court House for the occasion. The accident happened 20.10.1919 when an engine failed and crashed down through the man-engine shaft with casualties of some thirty one men. The man in mid centre of photograph is carrying a broad-bladed shovel used for 'vanning', a process used to assay tin content in a sample, much like gold panning.The chimney stack centre right belonged to the arsenic removal stage of operations.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

In Heavy Seas, RMS Lyonnesse Approaches Penzance Harbour

In heavy seas, RMS Lyonnesse approaches Penzance Harbour in a storm in the late 1880s. To the left can be seen the outline of St Michael's Mount.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

A Spring Tide In Mounts Bay Exposing The Ancient Forest

With St Michael's Mount and the Lizard in the background, this is a view of the remnants of the submerged forest in Mounts Bay, exposed during a Spring tide in 1890. The old name for St Michael's Mount was 'The Grey Rock in the Wood.'

Acquisition date: --

view details >

The Unveiling of The Memorial In The Morrab Gardens, Penzance, To Those Who Had Lost Their Lives In He South African War Which Ended In May 1902

On 5 November at 1530 hours 1904, this is the unveiling of the memorial to the fallen of the South African War which ended in May 1902. It was paid for by public subscription, made of Sicilian marble, and is the figure of a volunteer in khaki wearing a Baden-Powell hat and leaning on the butt end of a rifle. It was sculpted in London and laid on a granite pedestal with an inscription by Pascoe and Son of North Street, Penzance. The Duke of Cornwall's RGA Volunteer Band led the civic procession from the Public Buildings. Vaughn T Paul of Morrab Road, distributed postcards of the event.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

The Unveiling of The Memorial In The Morrab Gardens, Penzance, To Those Who Had Lost Their Lives In He South African War Which Ended In May 1902

On 5 November at 1530 hours 1904, this is the unveiling of the memorial to the fallen of the South African War which ended in May 1902. It was paid for by public subscription, made of Sicilian marble, and is the figure of a volunteer in khaki wearing a Baden-Powell hat and leaning on the butt end of a rifle. It was sculpted in London and laid on a granite pedestal with an inscription by Pascoe and Son of North Street, Penzance. The Duke of Cornwall's RGA Volunteer Band led the civic procession from the Public Buildings. Vaughn T Paul of Morrab Road, distributed postcards of the event and this is probably a framed picture of his.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

The Fish Monger Plies His Trade In Penzance

Mid morning on a sunny summer's day finds Dick Renfree, a Penzance jouster, selling fish from baskets on the back of his cart, ably assisted by his donkey and Alma Hosking.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Diamond Jubilee Celebrations At The Duke of Cumberland

The Duke of Cumberland was built in 1822 on a site known as 70 Causewayhead. The first publican was William James. John Hutchens ran the inn from 1873 to 1893. By 1919 Alfred Frost was the publican..

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Workmen For The Cornwall Power Supply Company Laying The First Electricity Cable In Penzance

The laying of the first electricity power cable in North Street (Causewayhead) Penzance.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Causewayhead In The Late Nineteenth Century

The shop on the left was run by the Stewart Family who were ironmongers, tin-smiths and plumbers. A large copper kettle above the entrance bore the name Thomas Stewart, Boiler and Gas Fitter. For many years this has been Pengelly's footware shop. The covered ope where two men are standing led to Stewart's Court which had five small cottages, occupied until 1930. Shops 8 and 9 were demolished at the turn of the 20th century and a large building erected for the Army and Navy Stores, owned by the Jenkinson family. In 1982 it became Mounts Bay Trading. Pearce's Barber's shop is adjacent. Parson's Grocery shop at No 13 is in 2011 a photography business. It moved to No 1 Causewayhead before the end of 1887 and several other trading locations and was in business for130 years.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Black And White Photograph

Fed by water from Madron, this reservoir at the top of Causewayhead wasconstructed in 1757and enlarged, lined with brick and walled in in 1797. It had a capacity of about 11,331 gallons of water. It fed six public spouts including the Town Shoot at the bottom of Causewayhead

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Black And White Photograph

The old town reservoir at Causewayhead. The site became the pig market before being used as a car park. Penzance reservoir constructed in 1757 served by a leat from Madron enhanced in 1750. The reservoir was walled in 1797and fed six public spouts

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Reservoir Court

Penzance's old reservoir at the top of Causewayhead showing its sluice gates, the site later became a pig market and a car park.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market Jew Street, Penzance, About 1880

The centre of the picture is dominated by the horse taxi rank. On the left is The Terrace with Fleming's, cabinet maker. Below is Oppenheim's Great Furnishing Mart which supplied high quality furniture and soft furnishings. Opposite R V and H Davy's shop is the elegant granite Bolitho Bank (demolished in the 1950s) which became Barclay's bank. Davy's was demolished in 1982 and the present post office (2011) was built in 1883 on the site of the small buildings on the right of the picture. Market Jew is a corruption of the Cornish for Thursday market.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

The Market House, Penzance

The Market House dominates Market Jew Street with its giant Ionic portico, It was opened on 14 June 1837 a year after the previous Market House was demolished. The statue of Humphry Davy dates from 1872. The railings on The Terrace were fixed in 1864. Openheim's 'Great Furnishing Mart' can be seen on the right of the picture and on the extreme left, part of the sign of 'Ship and Castle' which closed under the provisions of the Licencing Act in December 1927. This inn had a portico as did the Star Inn farther up the street. The Weslyan Quarterly Meetings were held in the 'Star' and the preachers often dined there. Earlier in the 1800s The Terrace was cut back and the road widened. Formerly the road sloped gradually, leaving a narrow cartway on the south side.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market Jew Street, Possibly At The Turn of The 20th Century

This is a photograph taken after 1864 when the porch of the Star Inn was removed and railings erected on The Terrace.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market Jew Street 1872-1882

Left to right: Jennings Lane; Nicholas Woolcock's refreshment house; Star Inn; John Bingham Borlase's pharmacy behind Symons' shop ; horse taxis; Market House; Humphry Davy statue; Lloyd's dome; The Terrace with railings mounted in 1864

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market Jew Street In The 1880s

Left to right: Post Office built in 1863; Star Inn; Symons is on the corner of New Street; York and Baird 1881-1896; Market House with a pennant flying above the dome; Humphry Davy statue; Oppenheim's Furniture Market with probably the oldest chimney in Penzance in 2013; Henry Joseph'e pawnbrokers which soon became the premises for the Gibson family photography business; James Henry Thomas the Tobacconist; Samuel Mears and Sons, boot manufacturers; Bolitho Bank built in 1834. The absence of traffic, including the horse buses would suggest this is a sunny Sunday morning. Gas lamps were lit at dusk.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market Cross Being Moved To The Morrab Gardens

This is the Market Cross - Ht 2.07m, wd 0.64m, dth 0.24m. Here it is being moved, for £15, from the Market House to the Corporation's depot in the Morrab Gardens prior to being re-sited there.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market Cross Being Moved To The Morrab Gardens

This is the Market Cross - Ht 2.07m, wd 0.64m, dth 0.24m. Here it is being moved, for £15, from the Market House to the Corporation's depot in the Morrab Gardens prior to being re-sited there.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market House Cross

This cross stood in the Greenmarket for many years as a boundary stone for the town; it was then moved to the bottom of Causewayhead, where it served as a tethering post for pigs en route to the Bullock Market. In order to make it fit into the recess in the Market House, the inscription was chipped away. In 1925 it was moved into the Morrab Gardens and in 1952 found its resting place in Penlee Park. It reads, 'The Cross of King Ricatus.' The Cross bears more inscriptions than any other in Cornwall and, if and when deciphered, would be a valuable source of information on Penzance. Height 2.07m, width 0.64m, depth 0.24m

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Market Cross In The Morrrab Gardens

The town cross in situ in the Morrab Gardens prior to being moved to Penlee House at a cost of £15. Ht 2.07m, wd 0.64m, dth 0.24m. Was first recorded at the Grenmarket; in 1829 it was moved to a location in Causeway head. Was moved to Morrab Gardens in 1899. £15 was charged to then move the cross to Penlee.

Acquisition date: --

view details >

Menu
Logo